FLYPIG,  PECAN PIG,  WOODEN PIG,  APPLACHIAN  FOLK TOY,   NUT PIG,      FLY OPERATED TOY,  MEXICAN TOY PIG,  INSECT INSIDE TOY PIG

The family is gathered around the fire, telling stories of their Cherokee and Scottish ancestors.  The house has few furnishings but you have noticed four wooden cups and a tiny carved pig on the board above the fireplace.    The flickering fire light makes shadows move about the room.  Suddenly the little pig appears to move.  Surely it is a trick of the light.  But wait, there it is again.  The ears of the toy are twisting about.  The father notices your interest in the pig and laughs.   How can a carved wooden pig move?    When the pigs eyes begin to spin, you are forced to ask what mysterious power is moving the toy.     The family howls with laughter when it is explained that a live fly is trapped inside the hollow body of the little pig and is moving the parts.  The pig's tail twitches to emphasize the point.

Click the blue link below to see a video of the flypig in motion.

Long, long ago

Imagine yourself in a much earlier time period of American history.  You have been invited into the log cabin of an Appalachian family.  It is a simple two room log structure with a fireplace at one end.  The only other source of light is a single candle on a crude table.  It is "old Christmas," January 6th, with a cold snowy wind just outside the leaky door.  

Please help us improve our site by sending us any information or photos of flypigs.   We are eager to learn more about the origin, time period, and distribution of these early American folk toys. 

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